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Work begins on Nation Hall renovation

May 15, 2014 12:00AM

Spring semester is over and at Pittsburg State that means that another residence hall is undergoing a major renovation.

Following the end of end of classes on Friday, May 16, the last of the students moved out of PSU’s residence halls. On the following Monday, contractors began work on a major overhaul of Nation West residence hall.

This is the sixth consecutive summer that the university has refurbished a residence hall. The multi-year project will conclude next summer with the renovation of Nation East and Mitchell.

Steve Erwin, associate vice president for campus life and auxiliary services, said the goal has been to provide modern, safe and comfortable living spaces for more than 1,250 students who live on campus.

“When we began, most of our residence halls looked much the same as they did when they were built in the ‘50s and ‘60s,” Erwin said. “When we complete these projects in 2015, every room on campus will have been touched. There are new, modern finishes in all of the rooms, expanded bathrooms, lounge areas and flexible modular furniture. Additionally, students will benefit from energy efficient windows and lighting and highly efficient heating and cooling systems.”

According to Lindell Haverstic, project architect in the Office of Facilities Planning, this summer’s construction will cost $3.1 million with an additional $197,000 for new windows in both Nation and Mitchell halls.

Haverstic said the work timeline is tight. The contract calls for the residence hall to be ready for students in time for classes to begin in August.

In addition to working hard to meet deadline, the university is making a special effort to make the project friendly to the environment.

“As we have in the past, we’re doing everything we can to make the project sustainable,” Haverstic said.

That includes not only the choice of new materials going in, but also the disposal of materials going out. PSU Physical Plant employees are working with the contractor to salvage any materials that can be saved, either for recycling or repurposing.

“The goal is to reduce construction waste that would otherwise be headed for the landfill,” Haverstic said.

©2014 Pittsburg State University