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Exhibit features Marjorie Schick’s pioneering art for the body

Exhibit features Marjorie Schick’s pioneering art for the body

A new art exhibit at Pittsburg State University showcases work that has had a major impact on the art world. At the same time, the art’s creator has had a major impact on generations of PSU students

A new art exhibit at Pittsburg State University showcases work that has had a major impact on the art world. At the same time, the art’s creator has had a major impact on generations of PSU students.

“Marjorie Schick: 50 Years Innovating Art for the Body” will run through May 6 in the University Gallery in Pittsburg State University’s Porter Hall. The exhibit features the work of Marjorie Schick, who came to teach art at PSU in 1967.

Over the past half-century, Schick has created art that has earned an international reputation. She has also mentored students and fostered a legion of teachers and artists.

Schick and her husband, James B. M. Schick, a professor of history, started teaching at PSU at the same time. James, an author, served as editor of the Midwest Quarterly for more than 30 years. During their years at PSU, both achieved University Professor level and national and international recognition.

Calling herself “quietly rebellious,” Schick’s body sculptures and large-scaled jewelry cross the boundaries separating jewelry, sculpture and fashion. Her work came to the attention of an international audience in the 1980s with a series of painted dowels that explored not only color and three-dimensional form, but also the scale of the objects in relationship to the human body.

Schick has continued an experimental approach and in 2004, was one of 100 contemporary craft artists interviewed for the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art Oral History Program. As part of that project, the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art has requested Schick’s papers.

Schick’s work can be found in museums and private collections around the world, including the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea; The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan; the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia; the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo, Norway; the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England; and the National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh.

Schick will deliver an artist’s lecture about her work at 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 6, in 109 Grubbs Hall. A reception in Porter Hall will follow the lecture.

The University Gallery is located in Porter Hall, 202 East Cleveland, on the PSU campus. The gallery is open from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Admission is free.

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